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If you were able to watch Avatar in a theatre with 3D glasses, all the credit goes to this man

October 04, 2019 at 05:00 pm | History, Tech & Innovation

Theodora Aidoo

Theodora Aidoo | Staff Writer

October 04, 2019 at 05:00 pm | History, Tech & Innovation

Kenneth J. Dunkley, inventor of 3D glasses

We all love going to the movies. At least some of us do and there’s nothing as enthralling as immersing yourself in another world just to relax after the stress of the day.

Over the years, cinemas have continued to improve theatre experience, especially with the rise of 3D technology. Today, more and more films are being offered in 3D format.

The unique selling point for 3D is that it creates a more immersive experience. If you’ve seen a 3D movie you can attest to the fact that it can pull you completely into a fictional world in such a way that a 2D movie can’t.

One movie where 3D technology was adopted is James Cameron’s Avatar. A 3D movie is absolutely worth seeing and one cannot do so without wearing special 3D glasses.

Thanks to Kenneth J. Dunkley, the world is having the 3D experience. Dunkley is known for inventing three-dimensional viewing glasses, or 3-DVG, an invention that displays 3-D effects from regular 2-D photos without any type of lenses, mirrors or optical elements.

Born in New York in 1939, Dunkley discovered that blocking two points in a person’s peripheral vision will cause an ordinary picture to appear three-dimensional.

Thus, he developed his 3-DVG to block out these points.

Kenneth J. Dunkley. Pic Credit: eoc-nassau.org

The 3-DVG can attain 3-D effects without lenses, mirrors or any optical elements. In 1986, he filed a patent for his 3-DVG glasses.

Dunkley did not only invent a 3-DVG, but he is reported to have also been a visual pioneer in the field of holography (optical illusion).

Like many African American inventors making black folks proud, Dunkley, who had a Master’s degree in Physics, had a piece of knowledge in nanotechnology education and he was an experienced Microsoft and robotics applications trainer.

Ever since Avatar brought 3D back into the cinemas in 2009, there has been an increasing interest for 3D technologies and all thanks should go to Dunkley for this.

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