In his 9th grade Tony Hansberry II created the novel surgical stitching technique that reduces complications

October 15, 2019 at 04:30 pm | Success Story, Tech & Innovation

Theodora Aidoo

Theodora Aidoo | Staff Writer

October 15, 2019 at 04:30 pm | Success Story, Tech & Innovation

Pic Credit: The BlackHistory Channel/Pinterest

Face2Face Africa is putting the spotlight on another teen with groundbreaking record. We’re focusing on Tony Hansberry II from Jacksonville, Florida – a prodigy in the medical field.

Back in 2009, at the age of 14, he came up with a surgical technique that will help surgeons reduce the time it takes to perform hysterectomies.

Hysterectomy is one of the most aggressive surgical procedures involving the removal of the uterus, cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. 

Born to a registered nurse and an African Methodist Episcopal church pastor, the Darnell-Cookman Middle/High School of Medical Arts freshman’s invention has helped to minimize complications during surgery.

What is now known as the “Hansberry Stitch”, the technique improved how the female sex organ is sutured after a hysterectomy. Thanks to him, time spent in such procedures has reduced including pains and complications.

Hansberry II came up with the novel method during his stint at Shands Hospital, Jacksonville. At that time he was enrolled at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research.

Describing him, lead medical teacher at the University of Florida, Angela Tenbroeck said Hansberry II was far advanced compared to his classmates, when it comes to surgical techniques. She added that he was at par with a first-year medical student at any university and was proud to have him as a member of her school.

His method proved so effective than the traditional method. The Hansberry Stitch aided surgeons to complete operations by stitching the patients back up after having a hysterectomy faster than it will normally take them.

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At age 14, Tony  invented a new surgical technique that can be used to reduce surgical complications . Pic Credit:blackmainstreet.net

In his own words, Hansberry says it only took him a day or two to come up with the concept, according to The Black History Channel.

His Hansberry Stitch got him a seat at a medical education event held at the University of Florida where he presented his project alongside physicians.

He went on to take up advanced classes in medicine at the Darnell-Cookman school, where medical school students master suturing in eighth grade.

Hansberry currently studies chemistry at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University with high hopes of becoming a trauma surgeon and making a difference in the lives of others.

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