Why Barack Obama feels the world would be better off with women as leaders than men

Francis Akhalbey Dec 17, 2019 at 10:30am

December 17, 2019 at 10:30 am | Women

Francis Akhalbey

Francis Akhalbey | Content Manager

December 17, 2019 at 10:30 am | Women

Photo Credit: Today Online/The Growth Faculty

Barack Obama begs to differ as to who should be in charge when it comes to running the affairs of a nation. According to the former president of the United States, having women as leaders across all countries will see a significant improvement in living standards.

Obama made these comments at a private event on leadership in Singapore, BBC reported Monday.

While the husband and father of two daughters admitted women aren’t perfect, he was adamant they are “indisputably better” than men.

“Now women, I just want you to know; you are not perfect, but what I can say pretty indisputably is that you’re better than us [men],” he said.

“I’m absolutely confident that for two years if every nation on earth was run by women, you would see a significant improvement across the board on just about everything… living standards and outcomes.”

In power from 2009 to 2017, the 44th president of United States also blamed the world’s problems on leaders who have clung on to power for so long and are refusing to let go after he was asked if he has contemplated going back to politics.

“If you look at the world and look at the problems it’s usually old people, usually old men, not getting out of the way,” he said, according to BBC.

“It is important for political leaders to try and remind themselves that you are there to do a job, but you are not there for life, you are not there in order to prop up your own sense of self importance or your own power.”

A very strong advocate for women empowerment, Obama echoed similar sentiments during his trip to South Africa for the centenary celebration of Nelson Mandela’s birthday in July 2018.

Whilst speaking to students at the town hall meeting of the inaugural class of “Leaders: Africa” in Johannesburg, he advocated for women to be empowered more on the continent because men have been getting on his nerves lately.

“Women in particular, by the way, I want you to get more involved,” he started.

“Because men have been getting on my nerves lately. Every day I read the newspaper and I just think like ‘brothers what’s wrong with you guys? What’s wrong with us?’ I mean, we’re violent, we’re bullying. You know, just not handling our business.

“So I think empowering more women on the continent, that, right away is going to lead to some better policies.”

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