by Farida Dawkins, at 05:13 am, December 31, 2017, Culture, Opinion

10 things American-born Africans can identify with

Being reared in the U.S. with African morals and values is a fascinating upbringing, to say the least. One quickly learns that they can never be too hard working as their parents more than likely had a more difficult upbringing than them. Cultural norms will always be at the forefront of any topic or life choice, and you’ll always have something to laugh about as our parents can be quite hilarious. When you live in an African household while living abroad:

Your parents are always right. It doesn’t matter what kind of data you bring to the table or if the information you’re trying to relay is backed by statistical facts. What your parents say, goes. Period.

People are always judging you.  So do the correct thing and you won’t have anything to worry or care about.

Manners are key, it doesn’t matter if it’s not popular. Please, thank you, and your tone of voice is the difference between peace and trouble ooo.

Education is imperative. Learning a trade or becoming a professional and successful in your desired field is the key to happiness and to financial stability.

Marriage is important. If you wait too long, expect the questions enquiring, what’s taking so long, to follow.

Respect is key. Even if you’re right, how you convey this matters, if it’s done in a poor manner, your argument is lost.

Even if you’re grown, you’re still a kid.” Elders don’t care so much if you’re even a middle-aged parent.

Experience is the best teacher. For all of you hard-headed ones out there.

Your parents adore you. They just show it by asking if you’ve eaten.

Become a person you can be proud of in the future. For the reason being that all that hard work that went into raising you wasn’t for nought.

Here are some experiences of some foreign-born Africans:

 

 

 

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