Archaeologists unearth more than 20 ancient wooden coffins dating back 4,000 years in Egypt [Photos]

October 16, 2019 at 05:00 pm | History, News

Nii Ntreh

Nii Ntreh | Staff Writer

October 16, 2019 at 05:00 pm | History, News

Coffins found in Luxor. Photo Credit: Egypt Antiquities Ministry via CNET.com

Egypt has found another batch of ancient coffins near the treasure-rich city of Luxor, officials say.

The coffins, numbering more than 20, has been described by the government as one of the world’s largest archaeological finds in the past few years, reports the Washington Post.

The coffins were found at a necropolis on the west bank of the River Nile. The necropolis, built by the ancient Thebans, reportedly dates back to about the 2nd millennium Before Common Era (BCE).

Ancient Egyptian coffins uncovered at the Theban necropolis of Asasif, near Luxor
Coffins found in Luxor, Egypt. Photo Credit: Egypt Antiquities Ministry via BBC

Although they are about 4,000 years old, the wooden coffins are reportedly in near-pristine condition.

CNN also reports that officials say the coffins or sarcophaguses are “as the ancient Egyptians left them.”

Ancient Egyptian coffins uncovered at the Theban necropolis of Asasif, near Luxor
Archaeologists inspecting the coffins. Photo Credit: Egypt Antiquities Ministry via BBC

Ancient Egyptians buried nobles and royalty in eccentric coffins accompanied by elaborate funeral rites that sometimes included the burial of a king’s servants.

Magnificent tombs, including the famous Giza Pyramids, housed these coffins.

The government has, since the finding, scheduled a press conference for Saturday to disclose further details.

Ancient Egyptian coffins uncovered at the Theban necropolis of Asasif, near Luxor
The wooden coffins are still in good condition even after thousands of years. Photo Credit: Egypt Antiquities Ministry via BBC

In a related development, an ancient “industrial area” full of royal artifacts has been uncovered in the northern African country of Egypt, an official statement said.

Archeologists working at the Luxor Valley of the Monkeys in southern Egypt said the place used to be known for producing ornaments, furniture and pottery for royal tombs.

All the artifacts are believed to date back to Egypt’s Eighteenth Dynasty, which spanned from around 1539 B.C to 1292 B.C.

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