Sexually potent at 101 years old, this Nigerian war veteran reveals the secret to his strength

July 22, 2019 at 03:00 pm | Lifestyle

Etsey Atisu

Etsey Atisu | Staff Writer

July 22, 2019 at 03:00 pm | Lifestyle

Pa Adama Aduku is Nigeria's longest living veteran at 101 | Punch Newspapers

Who thinks of sex or erection or even the ability to sustain an erection at such an age as 101? Well, it might not be a regular thing for all men but for this Nigerian war veteran, the unusual ability to still stay sexually active is a thing that he claims abides potently in his family.  

Pa Adama Aduku, Nigeria’s oldest living veteran says that even at his age, he still has the energy and stamina to make love to any woman, claiming that there are many young women in his community who have continually made passes at him.  

“I may be 101 years old, but inside me, especially when it comes to making a woman happy in bed, I am still strong and fresh,” boasted Aduku who was honoured by Vice-President Yemi Osinbajo and the 81 Division of the Nigerian Army in Lagos for being the country’s oldest living World War II veteran.  

“In my family, a man’s manhood never dies, irrespective of his age. So, I still have the energy to make love to any woman.” 

Aduku joined the military in 1942 at the age of 24 after what was an interesting inspiration to want to be a soldier.  

Speaking to Punch Nigeria, he described how as a young man, on his return from the farm one evening, he saw a man younger than he was at the time beating his village head.  

Aduku recalled with nostalgia how the man named Salikawa, a soldier, beat up his chief for refusing to carry his (soldier) bag and seeing him off to his house which was 10 miles away. 

“When the matter was reported to the District Officer, the chief was advised to obey the soldier in his own interest or face whatever consequences that resulted from that.” 

Angered by this, Aduku decided that he would also aim to become a soldier one day so that “I could go back to the village and also beat up Salikawa for humiliating our chief.” 

He indeed joined the military a few years after with the blessings of his father but the allure of being respected and feared by his kinsmen sparked his interest even more, amidst strong objections from some of his community members.  

Aduku went on to fight for the British Army in the Second World War. 

“In the course of that journey, we ran out of drinking water, so we had to rely on the water from the sea to drink despite it being salty,” he revealed of one of his journeys to Burma (now Myanmar) to fight in a war.  

He retired from the military a few years after, settling down to farm in his village, Abejukolo-Ife, under the Omaha Local Government Area of Kogi State. He made enough wealth through farming, as he recalled.

The centenarian has two wives and 10 children and is a great lover of tea – a drink he attributes his longevity and unusual strength to at 101. 

He told Saturday PUNCH that one of his greatest regrets in life is that none of his children agreed to follow in his footsteps by joining the army – a job he says if he had the chance to choose a career in life again, he would surely choose again.  

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