Opinions & Features May 30, 2019 at 02:39 pm

These African countries have been ranked the best in the world for children

Mildred Europa Taylor | Head of Content

Mildred Europa Taylor May 30, 2019 at 02:39 pm

May 30, 2019 at 02:39 pm | Opinions & Features

Schoolchildren in Rwanda. Pic credit: Africa Digna

Today, at least 280 million children, or 1 in 8, are dramatically better off than at any time in the past two decades, the organization has indicated in its new report.

A generation ago, a child was twice as likely to die before reaching age 5, 70 per cent more likely to be involved in child labour and 20 per cent more likely to be murdered, Save the Children, a human rights organization has said.

Today, at least 280 million children, or 1 in 8, are dramatically better off than at any time in the past two decades, the organization has indicated in its new report.

The Global Childhood Report ranks the best and worst countries for children by examining factors that rob children of their childhoods around the world such as child labour, teen pregnancy, exclusion from education, and children fleeing conflict zones.

The report shows that since 2000, circumstances for children have improved in 173 out of 176 countries. Globally, there has been progress on every End of Childhood Index indicator excluding one – children suffering due to conflict, the organization said.

The report added that there has been an 80 per cent rise in the number of people forced to flee their homes due to conflict – 30.5 million more people since 2000. The report highlighted 10 factors driving this change for children, which include the Millennium Development Goals, commitments from governments, social investments, new technologies, social media and increased female leadership at all levels.

Singapore ranked top as the country that best protects and provides for its children while the world’s poorest countries made the most dramatic progress, showing that “poverty does not have to be a barrier to progress, and political choices can matter more than national wealth.”

The following African countries made the biggest improvements since 2000 for children:

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