News March 11, 2013 at 12:00 am

Kenyatta Declared the Official Winner of Kenya’s Presidential Election

Lydia Njeri March 11, 2013 at 12:00 am

March 11, 2013 at 12:00 am | News

Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta on Saturday was declared the official winner of the 2013 Kenya Presidential Elections, making him the 4th president of the republic of Kenya. On the backdrop of 2007 post elections violence that almost brought the country to its knees, Kenyans proved to the world that they have matured politically as they peacefully ushered in their fourth president after five long anxiety filled days of vote counting.

Mr Kenyatta, Kenya's youngest president ever at only 51, was handed his certificate by Independent Electrol Boundaries Commission (IEBC) Chairman Isaack Hassan, who thanked Kenyans for their patience and for maintaining peace during the most trying time in the country.

Uhuru Kenyatta won the election with 6,173,433 of the total votes against his closest rival Raila Odinga who came in second with 5,340,546.

He surpassed the constitutional threshold of 50% plus one vote by 4,100 votes, garnering him 50.07 per cent of the votes.

The President-elect told hundreds of cheering supporters that he will make sure that everyone is heard and also extended a hand of friendship to his closet contender Raila Odinga who came in second.

“I thank my honorable brother Raila Odinga for his spirited campaign. I know that all candidates have made tremendous personal sacrifices to secure the progress of this country. I want them to join us in moving the country forward,” said Kenyatta.

But Mr Odinga, outgoing Prime minister in a press briefing refuted the results saying that the Democracy of the country was on trial. He accused the commission IEBC, which is tasked with delivering the results to Kenya, of tampering with the voting precess and vowed to go to court.

He claimed that the 2013 poll was a mere repeat of the last general elections.

But Kenyan citizens are ready to pick up the pieces, and never to return to the dark shadows of the 2007 post election violence. The results have settled in well with the majority.

 

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