Opinions & Features May 24, 2018 at 05:11 pm

The United Federation of African States and the Coming Great Quake

Dr. Wheeler Winstead May 24, 2018 at 05:11 pm

May 24, 2018 at 05:11 pm | Opinions & Features

african-unity

This vicious circle causes much despair for those who watch and wish for better days. Most of the organized coalitions are seen as groups of dictators who discuss how they can keep outsiders from interfering with their reign and accumulation of wealth. And more often than not, these “outsiders” are their own people who seek to be included in a government that listens to their voices and serves their needs. It is unfortunate that many of these leaders do not see themselves as part of the problem. They do, however, understand the power of unity, with many of them being strong proponents of a unified Africa. An example of one such person is Muammar Gaddafi.

It is clear to the true proponents of Pan-Africanism that a unified Africa cannot be a coalition of despots and villains. Pan-Africanism is a call to the people of Africa to unite, to believe in themselves and believe in their future destiny. It is a call to the African leadership for selfless leadership; leadership that puts the Commonwealth above their own wealth. It is a call to the world to stop, look and listen and appreciate the beauty, strength and endurance of the African people.

As Diop states, a United Africa must be an Africa that is united politically, economically and militarily. A United Africa means that the Ivory Coast does not have to negotiate with France by itself with little economic, political or military power to deal with such a superpower. It means that Somalia does not have to struggle by itself or look for handouts from the World Bank and the IMF to deal with its problems of poverty. It means that Angola does not negotiate by itself with the likes of China or the United States. It means that a united Africa comes to the table of the United Nations as the largest nation, with the oldest culture and history of accomplishments and the most resources of any nation in the world.

But just looking at Africa as a geographic continent will only give you part of the picture: A Pan-Africa could include all of the territories of the Caribbean where African slaves were taken. It could leverage and include all of the diaspora dispersed as slaves around the world and those who left voluntarily to far flung places, such as Canada, England, France, Germany, Russia, Brazil and every nation under God’s heaven.

This new Africa would be the third most-populous nation after China and India without counting those of the diaspora. This new Africa, this United Federation of African states, would negotiate in a different way with all of the superpowers around the issues of economics, politics and military might. This new Africa would indeed develop every known means for power, including nuclear power. This new Africa would be a force to be reckoned with.

As we move forward to establish this new nation, we must learn from the lessons of the past. An honest perspective of history reveals racism and racial superiority as the basis for the subjugation, manipulation and enslavement of Africans and African territories. Black Africans were considered inferior, lacking history and lacking culture. This was done to support the acts of thievery, subjugation, slavery and colonization. Africans have done much to refute, disapprove and reverse these false claims.

Much of the struggle of Africans for leadership was capsulized in the struggle against racism and white supremacy. When one examines racism, one finds that at its core are three primary pillars: pride, selfishness and fear. A truthful analysis and investigation of every people, group and community will reveal that none are exempt from these tendencies. For that reason, the struggle for a Pan-Africa and the United Federation of African states cannot be fought solely on the grounds of race. The constitution of this new Federation must include the anecdotes to racism: humility, community and faith.

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